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1969-S/S Cent New variety?

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  • 1969-S/S Cent New variety?

    I found the attached cent in a roll this weekend. It is Unc. or at worst AU. I'm certain that it is an RPM. On coppercoins.com it looks like 1MM-001 or 1MM-005. The die markers don't seem to match. I checked the others because two other ones seemed similar but no joy. There is a plethora of die gouges under LIBERTY. They do look like they are in relief and do not seem to affect the letters themselves.
    Any opinions?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    A new S/S is never out of the question when it comes to the S mints. personally I think some of the S/S mints are the hardest to determine should they be extremely close to each other.

    The first thing I look for in an S/S is an extra split line on the top of the "S", much like you see in the stock photo of the 1969-S 1MM-006 at coppercoins. Typically on a good strike, you'll see the original top of the "S" Notch on the outer side. If there is an additional notch or split in the top, or if the ball serif at the bottom of the "S" is split, It has potential to be a RPM.

    Don't always count on the Die Markers to be there. If a RPM is documented, the atrributor may have a handful of these which had a handful of markers they had at the time those coins were minted. With the dies having millions of coins made, the Die markers over time can fade. It also depends on the strength of the strike. Another thing - sometimes these dies - typically referred to as DMR or Die Marriage Registry - one of the dies can simply be replaced since it is old or in need of cleaning. If the markers are predominantly are on the reverse, then all bets are off trying to match die markers after the die is switched. There are typically three types of stages, if you will. These are "early" "medium" and "late" die states, or what many will call stages. The longer the dies are used, the coins will transition to the look of a freshly made coin, sharp and near cameo all the way to fuzzy and die cracks starting to appear. Though die markers can be there for a long time, many are simply gone or replaced with other die scratches, die chips or other matter over time.

    Many people will obtain a keen eye and look at the placement of the mint mark on each die variety. Since these are hand punched up to the mid 1990's, most of the dies will have a mint mark that's slightly different. Having that keen eye to identify which variety via the placement of the mint mark may help when the die markers aren't there, or have blended into the fields and devices.

    I think the mid to late 1960's all the way through the mid 1970's - the Lincoln Cents had the corner market on machine doubling issues. Ken Potter or John Wexler could describe the condition of the die machines back then. In any event, look for tell tale signs of machine doubling anywhere on the date and on LIBERTY. Sometimes even the slightest nicks in MD can make the "S" looked doubled. Playing devil's advocate, the 1969 year has had 46 years or so to identify all the different types of varieties in this year. Could they have missed one? Absolutely ! Could they have used a die for a very short period of time... sure.

    The photo's seem a little fuzzy for me to make an accurate determination on whats up with the mint mark. I don't know if this is shot by a camera on a phone, a hand held camera or a microscope. If its done by a hand held camera or phone, you can take the coin outside in non direct sunlight - shade even if it is required - and snap a few photos at different angles. Do not be afraid to turn the coin upside down and snap a photo of the affected area. You'd be surprised what it can show.

    If indoors is your thing, for the lighting, simply diffuse the light with some sheer cloth, or if the light does not get hot, rig up some thin plastic between the light and the coin. Even the thinnest plastic can make the difference, like a white plastic shopping bag, or other material that's semi-sheer. On most cameras, there is a "flower" that means its a MACRO or Closeup setting. Sometimes this will combine with an autofocus and its a lot easier to shoot the coin. One last thing, if the hand held camera has an auto snap feature, you can rig the camera up not to move - same with the coin. some you can prop up with stick pins or other things. as for the camera, things small as a pen cap can aid in getting the right elevation to shoot the coin at hand. I have a Rebel T3i, and as expensive as that thing is, its not the best in the macro setting world. I have an ancient Sony cybershot 8.1 MP camera that is truly amazing for shooting photos up close and personal. I can handle and snap photos up close and personal, and sometimes, after the shot is complete, look at the photo and enlarge it in photo viewer and see some details of say a RPM or DDR DDO.

    I hope this long winded note helps you out to identify and shoot some great photos in the near future.
    Gary Kozera
    CONECA State Representative for Virginia
    Website: http://www.minterrors.org
    Forums:http://minterrors.org/index.php?/forums/
    Auction House: http://auctions.minterrors.org
    Store: http://minterrors.org/index.php?/store/

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Gary for your response. BTW you have been helping me with my 2008-D dime MM issue too.
      You have cleared my head! I was being distracted by the die chips in the loops of the S. Of course they do not determine an RPM. Mine is just an ordinary S with similar looking die chips.
      Still it's a pretty coin, I'll keep it. (I still like shiny coins just like when I was a kid.)

      Comment


      • #4
        I suggest buying a roll of coins from a person on Ebay. Try a BU roll of D or S mint marks.

        Its best if the seller doesn't sell error coins, then the chances are they do not search the rolls.
        I occasionally buy from Ebay that sell rolls of coins, but that is not their primary thing they sell.
        The people that sell a limited amount of coins, and say, watches, dishes, toys and other items more than coins
        can produce some winner rolls. Its it to you what you'd like to buy and the condition.

        I like the BU rolls from the 1930's to 1972, mainly the D&S mints. I find my fair share of RPM's or other issues this way.

        Good Luck ! Keep digging, there are some winners out there !
        Gary Kozera
        CONECA State Representative for Virginia
        Website: http://www.minterrors.org
        Forums:http://minterrors.org/index.php?/forums/
        Auction House: http://auctions.minterrors.org
        Store: http://minterrors.org/index.php?/store/

        Comment

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