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1964-P Jefferson Nickel DDO-007 (almost sure, but hard to be 100% due to wear)

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  • 1964-P Jefferson Nickel DDO-007 (almost sure, but hard to be 100% due to wear)

    I'm almost sure this is DDO-007, but I wanted to run it by the experts here for a second opinion. The separation lines have mostly been worn down, but I believe they are still visible on the W in WE, the right outside edge of the O in GOD, and the right outside edge of the second leg of the N in IN. I have photographed it next to a normal coin of the same date to highlight the extra thickness. Where separation lines can no longer be made out. DDO-007 is the coin on the bottom and the regular one is the coin stacked on top of it in the photos. Thanks!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I also believe I have matched the most prominent die marker listed on Brian's Variety Coins. First image is my coin, second is from his site.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      I guess it is possible, but when you can't see the doubling, and there is enough circulation wear to flatten out the devices, I don't see putting a lot of work into trying to identify it. The whole idea about collecting doubled die varieties is seeing the doubling/distortion/notches/separation etc. In this case, we can't positively identify any of that.
      Bob Piazza
      Lincoln Cent Attributer

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      • #4
        mustbebob with a fairly significant die like this, I'm okay with not being able to see the separation lines since the extra thickness still shows. The separation lines also are still visible on a couple letters (the N, O, and W, mostly), so with that and the parallel die scratches on the reverse, I feel pretty confident in my ID at this point. Obviously I'd love if it were in better shape, but as long as I feel confident that it is the doubled die and not just die deterioration doubling, then it's still well worth saving to me.

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        • #5
          By all means, save it for your collection, especially if you feel confident with your attribution. My point is that if it ever came to sending it out for grading and/or attribution, the things I mentioned might be grounds for not assigning it the variety number. In addition, if you were to ever sell it as the DDO, the buyer would have to be as sure as you are.
          Bob Piazza
          Lincoln Cent Attributer

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          • #6
            mustbebob good to know, thanks for the tips. I have never submitted any of my coins for attribution before, and I would be worried that if I sent this off it would probably be dismissed out of hand because of the wear and DDD obscuring the doubling.

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