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1970 extreme cud????

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  • 1970 extreme cud????

    My buddy was doing some roll hunting and out came this 1970... idk what happened to it penny... the cladding seems intact.. its shiny on the front, but something is extremely wrong with it... any ideas?20210511_205238.jpg
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  • #2
    This is all post mint damage. Couldn't tell you how it happened, but it is definitely damage.
    Bob Piazza
    Lincoln Cent Attributer

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    • #3
      I'll try to get some better pics after I get off work, I am not doubting you, but there are some things I definitely question a little... at 1st glance I thought the same thing, I will try to highlight exactly what I am talking about... but again I dont doubt your answer just relooked at the pictures is all

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      • #4
        Ok, so like I said I dont disagree with you on somethings happend after mint, the weird things I've noticed is that the rim, as broken as it looks is still attached to the penny, the way the damage looks to be so smooth, yet I can see that there are marks all consistent with each other, is definitely not coincidence. But then I thought the back of the coin should show something at least some marks of that kinda pressure.... but ...it really doesn't its far from perfect but not what I would assume if pressure like that was applied from the front... also it weighs 3.26 grams16209162907617445183156758644402.jpg
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        This gallery has 6 photos.

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        • #5
          You never posted a pic of the reverse until now, but that doesn't change anything. As I mentioned before, this is all post mint damage. I think we can agree on that. In my mind, something scraped against to top of the coin. I also mentioned that I couldn't tell you how it happened. If we were there when this happened, I could give you a better idea. I don't know what else you want me or anyone else to say. Anything said will be a guess, unless the perpetrator of the coin abuse is here on the forum (I know...bad joke). Most definitely one of a kind, but we will wait a bit to see if anyone else wants to give it a go as to what happened and how.
          Bob Piazza
          Lincoln Cent Attributer

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          • #6
            I agree this was damaged.
            Jason Cuvelier

            CONECA
            Lead attributer

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            • #7
              Looks like the strike was good on the front and back. It is post mint damage unfortunately. I for one always lean towards PMD since these coins can go through a lot of abuse. People do things to coins in order to try to drum up some head scratching from collectors. I looks like it could have been used as a shim and was slightly squeezed and moved from the west to the east.

              Cud are basically parts of the die missing that does not leave an inpression on a planchet. Think of a round puzzle of the obverse of a Lincoln Cent. If you make the puzzle 100%, but start to remove a few sections of the puzzle in the same area along the rim, that is what a cud would look like. Now, if you remove as many pieces from that puzzle as you see in your photo, the die would have crumbled a long time ago.

              The coin you have has multiple PMD issues, honestly. It shows scrape or sheer marks. It has indications on Lincolns' head in the center that it may have been some sort of vice or pressure applied to it. But in the end, the cent was exposed to something hot - close to 1200 degrees F, then slid within something to do that damage.

              If these coins could tell us a story of what happened to them, we'd all learn something. = )
              Gary Kozera
              CONECA State Representative for Virginia
              Website: http://www.minterrors.org
              Forums:http://minterrors.org/index.php?/forums/
              Auction House: http://auctions.minterrors.org
              Store: http://minterrors.org/index.php?/store/

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 1Slimguy View Post
                My buddy was doing some roll hunting and out came this 1970... idk what happened to it penny... the cladding seems intact.. its shiny on the front, but something is extremely wrong with it... any ideas?20210511_205238.jpg
                others have already said pretty much everything that needs to be.

                i'll just add that CUDS are raised/high/above the field/rim/edge and your coin has areas that are depressed/lower/below the surface line. cuds are raised since a piece(s) of the die have broken off which leaves an area that fills with the metal of the blank coin. no die metal there doesn't allow for the coin in that area to be pressed into the design area since that design area is now gone.

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                • #9
                  The front and back of a rim to rim die break - a CUD:
                  Raised on the front from the metal filling the cavity
                  Lowered area on the reverse side of the CUD

                  IMG_4448.JPG IMG_4449.JPG
                  Jason Cuvelier

                  CONECA
                  Lead attributer

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