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CONECA (pronounced: CŌ´NECA) is a national numismatic organization devoted to the education of error and variety coin collectors. CONECA focuses on many error and variety specialties, including doubled dies, Repunched mintmarks, multiple errors, clips, double strikes, off-metals and off-centers—just to name a few. In addition to its website, CONECA publishes an educational journal, The Errorscope, which is printed and mailed to members bimonthly. CONECA offers a lending library, examination, listing and attribution services; it holds annual meetings at major conventions (referred to as Errorama) around the country.

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2015 P Roosevelt dime Error

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  • 2015 P Roosevelt dime Error

    As I stated in my post as a new member, I had some wild coin finds. Well, here is the first of them. A 2015 P Roosevelt dime, I believe one of a kind mint error. Through all my research of Wexler's die and mint error classifications and several dealer opinions at shows, I've yet to settle on a particular error classification for this dime.

    My first inclination in my research was a Late Stage die cap TDO, and DDR, incused, Error Ref.Part VI. As I researched further, I find myself leaning more toward a Triple Stutter Strike with counterclockwise hub rotation, coupled with a hub polar shift. Opinions welcome.
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  • #2
    It appears to me to be just die deterioration.

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    • #3
      I will say this about the obverse strike.
      The two strike impressions directly above the hair line which definitely follow the hair line of the third and final strike are no way caused by die degradation. Also the obverse side is concave like it was struck more than once or twice. Only die pressure could do that and still leave a clean center device strike.

      Dear N-6503
      Given the fact that I've had four coin dealers both local and at coin shows, including PAN agree that there is definitely doubling on both obverse and reverse when viewed through a loop. In the microscope there is a third strike which distorts portions of the outer details. You may be right that die damage could simultaneously account for portions of its appearance. I'll try to post some close up detailed photos.
      . Thanks for your input. I may just submit it as a DDO/DDR for grading and let them sort it out.
      Last edited by jcuve; 06-13-2021, 02:13 PM.

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      • #4
        As promised, here are photos taken by my coin microscope. Stutter Strike Type II

        PART VI. Striking Errors:

        Stutter Strikes:

        Stutter Strikes due to planchet flexion (Type II):




        Definition: A stutter strike is a rare error that can be thought of as the polar opposite of machine doubling. While the extra impressions of machine doubling occur after the downstroke of the hammer die reaches its lowest point, a stutter strike occurs before the downstroke has completed its downward trajectory. In a stutter strike, the hammer die makes initial light contact with the surface of the coin, but completes its descent in a slightly different position relative to the original point of contact. The result is a thin crescent of design at the outer margin of coin, distinctly separate from the definitive strike.

        A stutter strike can result from movement of the die, movement of the coin, or expansion of the coin during the downstroke. It always occurs together with at least one other press malfunction or error. Associated errors include an off-center strike or broadstrike atop a stiff collar, an indent or partial brockage, or a loose die in combination with any of the aforementioned errors.
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        Last edited by Coindog; 06-06-2021, 09:07 AM.

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        • #5
          The stutter strike does account for some of what I see. However, I am not an error specialist, so that needs to be addressed by someone else who can make a positive ID.

          I do not recommend just submitting the coin as a DDO/DDR and having someone else figure it out. It is not a variety, and as such should not be submitted as one.
          Bob Piazza
          Lincoln Cent Attributer

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          • #6
            Mustbebob, I would love to send this dime to John Wexler as a discovery error but, I don't have a clue how to do that. I read coinworld discovery articles by him about people submitting finds for him to attribute. Maybe someone can help with that here.

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            • #7
              If you go to Wexler's site (http://www.doubleddie.com/1467540.html), there are instructions for submitting coins in the left hand column. I believe it is the second item down.
              Bob Piazza
              Lincoln Cent Attributer

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              • #8
                A BIG THANK YOU BOB. I just loaded one of my favorite penny DDR errors.

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                • #9
                  It's all die wear.
                  Jason Cuvelier

                  CONECA
                  Lead attributer

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                  • #10
                    So the entire outer portion of the die went to total hell at the same time. Hmmm. The foot of the L in Liberty is totally doubled in my opinion. I'll find out soon enough when it comes back from this guy that lives near me, Mr. Wexler.
                    Last edited by Coindog; 06-13-2021, 03:07 PM.

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                    • #11
                      John is in bad health, hopefully he can look at it and get back to you. From the photos it has the appearance of die wear to me. 2015 was a bad year for dime dies. Go to ebay and type "2015 dime ddo" and you will see a bunch of dimes with die wear....
                      Jason Cuvelier

                      CONECA
                      Lead attributer

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, Hope he has the time too. I'll check out Ebay. I generally try to stay away from FleeceBay. LOL. If I can't touch or loop before I buy it, I don't.

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                        • #13
                          I just had this dime looked at by another coin dealer this weekend and was told it's a broadstrike in collar. Told the tell tale signs are the outward distortions of the edge details and the contours of the strike from the center outward on both obverse and reverse.
                          I've heard references to in collar Broadstrike but never personally seen one.

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                          • #14
                            First of all, a broadstrike is the result of the collar not deploying in the first place and the coin being stuck so that it is not contained by anything. For the dealer to say this is a broadstrike in the collar is just plain wrong and I am thinking that maybe they do not understand the striking process. The collar also determines the size of the stuck coin, and this coin is not any larger that I can determine. Maybe this is just die wear as some here have suggested. Sometimes, the most obvious is the answer.
                            Bob Piazza
                            Lincoln Cent Attributer

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                            • #15
                              Mustbebob, I didn't think there was such a thing as an in collar broadstrike. Like I said, I've heard people use the term and thought, maybe they know something I've never heard of. I always thought a broadstrike occured partially or completely out of collar, is my understanding. Thanks for confirming my suspicions of what this person told me. This is just one messed up die when it struck.

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